Ohio City Provisions: a new, and true Farm to Fork concept

The term “Rise and Shine” was made for people like Trevor Clatterbuck and Adam Lambert.  They have been getting up before sunrise for months, working long hours readying their new project.  And it’s pretty exciting.  Both are heavy weights in Cleveland’s local food scene independently, (Trevor is the man behind Fresh Fork Market, a very popular CSA business (community supported agriculture) in Cleveland.  Adam is a well-established local chef, who’s logged hours in the kitchens of Bar Cento, and The Black Pig, to name just a couple) but together they’re doing something that isn’t being done anywhere else in town.

OCP Rise and Shine

The plans are to open up a market and butcher shop in the Ohio City neighborhood of Cleveland, near St. Ignatius High School.  The two plan to grow or raise everything they’ll sell there.  Fans of Fresh Fork will find all the good quality produce they’re used to (sourced from farms within 75-100 miles of Cleveland, organic when possible, and picked at the peak of freshness).

OCP produce

But what’s new, innovative and mouth-watering…is what they’re doing with hogs.  The pair have been experimenting with animal husbandry and feed to develop meat that you can’t get anywhere else in the state.

OCP hogs

I got a tour of the property in Holmes County where they have about 150 hogs on site.  Mangalitsa, Berkshire, Mulefoot, Red Wattle…all new vocabulary to me.  But what they have planned is not…charcuterie.  Yes, please!

OCP jen and a hog

They’ve got a supply chain in place, thanks to their “adventures in hog sourcing.”  The details of which the pair chuckle about, but don’t care to share.  After all, learning about heritage breeds is new territory for them too.  Clatterbuck has a background in business and political science.  Lambert is a self-taught chef.  But the two both seem right at home on the 200 acre property where they plan to get a lot of their product.

OCP Wholesome Valley Farm

They’re promising the best pork in the state.  The red wattles are said to be more tender.  The mangalitsas, used for things like Jamon Iberico.

OCP mangalitsa

What takes time, but will be worth the wait, I’m told…is controlling the product…all of it…from start to finish.  They are playing with breeds and what they feed the animals to get optimal product.  These hogs are given specific ratios of barley and grass from the fields.  Lambert says they have marbled loins, and even appear more red than pink when you cut into them.

Red Wattle Pig at Wholesome Valley Farm in Holmes County, Ohio

Red Wattle Pig at Wholesome Valley Farm in Holmes County, Ohio

Plus, they’re also raising other animals.  They have laying chickens, meat birds and heritage birds, whose pens and coops are moved weekly to insure exposure to fresh grass and soil for them to feed on, not to mention fresh air.

OCP mobile coop

They’re also working on ways to make heritage poultry more affordable. (which currently takes 18 wks.)

OCP heritage birds

The Hereford beef they are raising will be grass-fed, sustainable and have better flavor, according to Clatterbuck.  Those with smaller frames, he says, are easier to finish without incorporating high energy corn and grain.  Their plans also include growing non-GMO (and eventually, organic) corn and soy beans on site so the animals can feed off that.

OCP beef

There is so much in the works it’ll make your head spin.  The infrastructure is already in place for maple syrup production.  There are hives on site, for bees to pollinate the produce and generate honey.

OCP maple syrup infrastructure

They have secured their cannery, bakery, frozen foods and ferments permits.  OCP has acquired heavy machinery like bean snippers and corn huskers to handle the volume when fresh produce “comes in like a hurricane,” as Clatturbuck says.

OCP canned goods

When the store is up and running you can expect incredible products.  Believe me, I’ve had some of Chef Lambert’s charcuterie and it is unbelievable.  A true art.  But he’s even upped his game.  Clatterbuck and Lambert are fresh off a 2 day charcuterie workshop in Gascony, France.

forage with strangers charcuterie

And since it costs more (time and money) to raise these kinds of hogs, you can bet they won’t be selling them as pork chops.  You’ll see smoked and cured meats, specialty sausage and charcuterie.

Rendering of the Ohio City Provisions storefront

Rendering of the Ohio City Provisions storefront

Clatterbuck and Lambert are aiming to open Ohio City Provisions in January.  Can’t wait to see what will fill their cases, and the bellies of Clevelanders once they open their doors.

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Honey Glazed Grilled Stone Fruit with Mint Lime Yogurt Dip

When you get fresh organic produce delivered to your doorstep each week, it’s easy to get inspired.  Door to Door Organics has been supplying my family with beautiful fruits and vegetables this summer, and asked me to create an original recipe using their inventory.  There was so much to work with, that I actually created two!  The first I’ll share is a sweet app, or light dessert that my guests (and children) gobbled up.  It’s Honey Glazed Grilled Stone Fruit and a Mint Lime Yogurt Dip.  

I’m excited about this post because it is my first GIVEAWAY!  I have a couple $50 gift certificates to give away as part of my partnership with the online grocer, newly launched in the Greater Cleveland/Akron area.  Details and instructions at the end of the post.  Now, back to the business of recipe creation!

I love stone fruit.  Peaches, plums, apricots, nectarines…they’re all wonderful to snack on, and cook with.  And I was happy to discover how much my kids enjoyed them too.  But just slicing them up and serving them plain seemed boring and uninspired to me.  So I took a couple of items that arrived in a recent Door to Door Organics delivery and turned them into something pretty spectacular, and supremely easy.  That’s what makes me one of their #KitchenMavens,I suppose!

mint-lime-yogurt-dip

The dip is just a couple of ingredients, and can be altered based on what you have on hand.  I made it a couple of different ways to see which I preferred.  My first variety (and my favorite) marries just three ingredients:

-5oz.vanilla flavored Greek yogurt, a tablespoon of chopped organic fresh mint, the zest of half of an organic lime.  I blended those in a small food processor and refrigerated that while I grilled up the fruit.

Other varieties and variations that also worked for me:

-5 oz. plain Greek Yogurt, a tablespoon of honey, then the same amounts of lime zest and mint.

-5 oz. Stoneyfield Low Fat French Vanilla Organic Yogurt (available via Door to Door Organics) plus above mentioned lime zest and mint leaves.  This version was more runny, but less sour and I know some people take issue with the flavor of Greek yogurt.

julia-loves-yogurt

Bonus: this dip can also be eaten just like regular yogurt, as proven by my best taste-tester and recipe-approver, my 20 month old daughter.

The grilled fruit part is even easier.  Just work with whatever stone fruit you prefer.  I like peaches and nectarines best with this, but apricots and plums will also work.  Since the organic plums and apricots have been on sale and in season with my partner in this post, I used those.  (Note: the fruits hold up better when they’re less ripe) Slice them down the middle and remove the pit.  Then brush each side with some honey and place them flesh side down on a grill or grill pan.  Each piece of fruit only takes a couple minutes on the grill at medium/high heat, just enough to get those beautiful grill marks on them.  Remove them to cool, then slice them up.  And….you’re done!  

honey-glazed-grilled-stone-fruit

Double Bonus: Gotta put a Cheftovers twist on this, right?!   These can also turn into frozen yogurt pops.  I took the sliced grilled fruit and yogurt dip that wasn’t eaten, pureed it in a blender, poured it into Popcicle molds and popped them in the freezer for another time.  They were eaten just as quickly as the yogurt alone.  

  Now to this business of a giveaway!  Want to win??  Please do me the “flavor” of following my pals as Door to Door Organics,

 And my followers and friends will get $10 off their first order by using my exclusive  Cheftovers Coupon.

If you want $50 is FREE ORGANIC GROCERIES delivered to your doorstep, please COMMENT on this post.  I’ll be picking a winner at random.  (and if they don’t operate in your zip code, you can always send the e-certificate to a friend who could use it)

Berry Boozy Arnold Palmer

Cheftovers is expanding into cocktails!  And if this first one is any indication of what I’ve got shaking and stirring around in my little head, happy hour is gonna be great this summer. 

Who doesn’t love an ice cold Arnold Palmer in the summer?  For those unfamiliar, this traditional summer drink is a half-and-half mix of iced tea and lemonade.  Cool and refreshing, it’s one of my favorites.  So I decided to give it a new twist and turn it into a “cooler.”  In summers past, I’ve been introduced to a few varieties of iced tea vodkas, Firefly Vodka is my pick.

Firefly-vodka

Now this wouldn’t be a Cheftovers cocktail without a leftovers element.  I like a little splash of fruit in both my lemonade and my iced tea.  And it just so happens that I had a boat load of frozen berries in my freezer.

frozen-blackberries

I like to toss them in there when I get BOGO pints or when they’re getting too ripe.  Don’t toss ’em, freeze ’em!  I thought I’d substitute frozen cubes of fruit for ice cubes, so as not to water down the drink and add that subtle fruit flavor I was after.

frozen-raspberries

I tossed what I found in the freezer, (a mix of blackberries, strawberries and raspberries) into the blender, then added about a tablespoon of honey, some water, a squeeze of lemon juice from a single wedge, and a generous splash (like a 1/4 cup) of limoncello (an Italian lemon flavored liqueur).

blended-frozen-fruit

I blended it until smooth, then poured the mixture into ice cube trays to freeze.

berry-ice-cubes

When those were good to go, it was time to bust out the shaker.  Staying true to the original Arnold Palmer recipe, I mixed one part Firefly sweet tea vodka with one part lemonade, added some ice cubes to the shaker and did the “it’s almost happy hour” dance to shake it all up and chill the mixture.

berry-ice-cubes

I poured the iced tea vodka/lemonade over the berry ice cubes, and garnished it with a sprig of mint for a classy touch.  Cheers!

For another (and less sweet) take on this drink, try lemon flavored vodka (like Absolut Citron), and unsweetened ice tea.  What are you mixing up for your patio parties?  

“sCRUMBtious” Shrimp

I like potato chips a whole lot.  And it always pains me to toss the end of the bag away, along with all those perfectly good crumbs.  But until this week, the only way I knew to consume them was through a very undignified method of upending the bag and pouring them into my mouth.  Not ladylike.

I love to take a whole Sunday afternoon and just experiment in the kitchen.  This week I was able to try out a handful of things.  Some things worked, some didn’t (I’ll spare you the details of the failures).  The results of what did work was pretty damned tasty.  Potato Chip Crusted Shrimp with a pair of dipping sauces, Honey Sriracha and Chipotle BBQ.

leftover Lays

I grabbed the remnants of what was a jumbo bag of Lays chips out of my cupboard and crushed them inside the bag (less mess!!) I used my hands and a rolling pin.  When then were almost the size of bread crumbs I was satisfied.

potato chip crumbs

Since the chips were already moist (and seasoned) and the shrimp I was working with were wet, I chose to skip the usual 3-step breading process: flour, egg and breading…and just go right to the breading.  The coating would probably stick better with the standard method, but I was looking to use up my calorie count with the chips instead of the flour and egg.  I coated the shrimp in the potato chips crumbs and thought it best to move quickly before they dried and fell off.

potato chip coated shrimp

A chef friend of mine, Brandt Evans, taught me how to make pretzel crusted trout, and one of his tricks was to add oil (about a tablespoon of canola) to a cold pan and then put the seafood in, to avoid burning the coating.  I tried that in this case, and it worked well.  It goes against what most of us know, but it’s the right call here.

fried potato chip crusted shrimp

This step just took a few minutes on the frying pan.  I put it on medium/high heat and they were golden brown in only about 3 minutes.  Now, prior to browning up the shrimp, I started experimenting with the dipping sauces.  First thought: Honey Sriracha.  I’m very in to “sweet heat” nowadays.  And it was done in no time at all.  I just put a couple of teaspoons of honey in a ramekin and heated it up so it would mix well with a dash of Sriracha, my new favorite hot sauce.  This step is up to you, however hot or sweet you want it.  Find your happy place.

chipolte BBQ sauce

If you don’t keep Sriracha in your fridge, try a Chipotle BBQ variety instead.  I just put a couple of tablespoons of BBQ sauce in another ramekin, and added a dash of chipotle chili, and the same amount of cumin for some smokey flavor.  I fired that up in the microwave to heat it up.  Both sauces were good.  But I preferred the Honey Sriracha.

The end result of this experiment was a great appetizer.  But you could certainly apply this to a larger volume of shrimp and be pretty satisfied!  I encourage you to try something in the kitchen this week…and report back!